You're all set!

To start developing, please head over to our developer documentation.

Activate the Google Street View Image API

To get you started we'll guide you through the Google Developers Console to do a few things first:

  1. Create or choose a project
  2. Activate the Google Street View Image API
  3. Create appropriate keys
Continue

Get API Key and Signature

To use the Google Street View Image API, you must register your app project on the Google API Console and get a Google API key which you can add to your app or website.

Quick guide to getting a key

Step 1: Get an API Key from the Google API Console

Click the button below, which guides you through the process of registering a project in the Google API Console, activates the Google Street View Image API automatically, and generates a generic, unrestricted API key.

Get a Key

Notes:

  • Tip: During development and testing, you can register a project for testing purposes in the Google API Console and use a generic, unrestricted API key. When you are ready to move your app or website into production, register a separate project for production, create a browser-restricted API key, and add the key to your application.
  • Standard API users: If you're using the API under the standard plan, you must use an API key. In addition, we recommend that you include a digital signature. The digital signature is required under certain circumstances. See more about API keys and digital signatures for the standard API.
  • Premium Plan customers: For production-ready apps, you must use a browser-restricted API key that is set up in the Google Maps APIs Premium Plan project created for you when you purchased the Premium Plan, as well as a digital signature. Alternatively, you can authenticate your application using use a client ID and digital signature (instead of an API key).
  • For more information, see the detailed guides below for Standard Plan and Premium Plan customers.

Step 2: Add the API key to your application

When loading the Google Street View Image API, substitute YOUR_API_KEY in the code below with the API key you got from the previous step.

https://maps.googleapis.com/maps/api/streetview?location=41.403609,2.174448&size=456x456&key=YOUR_API_KEY

More about API keys

  • The API key allows you to monitor your application's API usage in the Google API Console. See Google API Console help for more information.
  • If you are a Standard Plan customer, with an API key you have access to generous free daily quota, as well as the option to increase your daily quota by enabling pay-as-you-go billing.
  • If you are a Premium Plan customer, you must use an API key or your client ID to access all the custom features and benefits of your Premium Plan.
  • Registering for an API key ensures that Google can contact you about your application if necessary.

Detailed guide for users of the standard Google Street View Image API

  • For the standard API, the recommended method of authentication is to include an API key and a digital signature in all requests to the Google Street View Image API. The API key is required. The digital signature is required if you enable pay-as-you-go billing. The unique signature allows our servers to verify that any site generating requests using your API key is authorized to do so.
  • If you use the standard API without enabling pay-as-you-go billing, you need an API key. The digital signature is recommended but optional.

Follow these steps to get an API key:

  1. Go to the Google API Console.
  2. Create or select a project.
  3. Click Continue to enable the API.
  4. On the Credentials page, get an API key.
    Note: If you have an existing unrestricted API key, or a key with browser restrictions, you may use that key.
  5. From the dialog displaying the API key, select Restrict key to set a browser restriction on the API key.
  6. In the Key restriction section, select HTTP referrers (web sites), follow the on-screen instructions to set referrers (web sites), then click Save. Read more about restricting API keys.
  7. (Optional) Enable billing. See Usage Limits for more information.
    Note: If you choose to enable billing, you should set up and use a digital signature in all requests, as well as your API key.


In the Google API Console, you can also look up an existing key or view a list of enabled APIs.

For more information on using the Google API Console, see API Console Help.

Digital signatures for the standard API

Requests to the Google Street View Image API should include a signature parameter, containing a digital signature which you must generate using a shared URL signing secret. Your shared secret is available on the Google API Console.

Note: If you have enabled pay-as-you-go billing, the digital signature is required. If you exceed the free limit of 25,000 map loads per day, additional map loads are billable for the remainder of that day. Billable map loads that do not include a digital signature will fail. If you use the standard API without enabling pay-as-you-go billing, the digital signature is recommended but optional.

The signing process uses an encryption algorithm to combine the URL and your shared secret. The resulting unique signature allows our servers to verify that any site generating requests using your API key is authorized to do so.

Creating a digital signature is a two-step process:

The sections that follow explain the above steps in detail.

Step 1: Get your URL signing secret

Your cryptographic URL signing secret is available on the Google API Console. The secret, also known as a private key, is encoded in a modified Base64 for URLs. This secret is shared between you and Google, and is unique to your API key. Please keep your URL signing secret secure. Do not pass it any requests, store it on any websites, or post it to any public forum. Anyone obtaining this URL signing secret could spoof requests using your identity.

You can click this link to go directly to the API Console page containing your URL signing secret. Important: In the project drop-down menu, be sure to select the same project you used when you created the API key for Google Street View Image API.

Alternatively, follow these steps to see your URL signing secret:

  1. Go to the Google API Console.
  2. From the Project drop-down menu, select the same project you used when you created the API key for Google Street View Image API.
  3. From the APIs list on the Dashboard page, click the name of the Google Street View Image API. The API details display, with the Overview tab open.
  4. Click the URL signing secret tab.

To get a new URL signing secret, select Regenerate secret. The previous secret expires 24 hours after you've generated a new one. After the 24 hours have passed, requests containing the old secret no longer work.

Step 2: Generate a digital signature, for use with API keys

To create a digital signature for your request, follow the steps in the detailed guide below.

Detailed guide for users of the Google Maps APIs Premium Plan license

When using the Google Street View Image API with a Google Maps APIs Premium Plan license, you must authenticate your application with either an API key or your client ID. In addition, a digital signature is also required. Note: If you have a previous Maps API for Business license, you must use a client ID, not an API key.

When deciding on which authentication method to use, consider the following:

  • API key (available to Google Maps APIs Premium Plan customers but not to holders of a previous Maps API for Business license) — By using an API key to authenticate requests, you can:
  • Client ID — By using your client ID (instead of an API key) to authenticate requests, you can:
    • Add the channel parameter to requests so you can view more detailed usage reports.
    • View usage reports with more than 30 days of data in the Google Cloud Support Portal.
    • Use Maps Analytics tools for the Maps JavaScript API.

Get more information on reports available to Premium Plan customers.

Note: The information below on using an API key applies only to the Google Maps APIs Premium Plan, which became available on January 6, 2016.

Have a previous Maps APIs for Work or Maps API for Business license? See our Maps APIs for Work Licenses guide. To determine whether you have a previous license: In the Google Cloud Support Portal, click Maps: Usage Report on the left. If the ID at the top of the report is in the following format, you have the new Premium Plan:
gme-[company] & proj-[number] ([type])
Otherwise, you have a previous license.

Authenticating your application using an API key

To authenticate the Street View API using an API key, you will require two authentication parameters: an API key, and a unique digital signature.

Follow these steps to get an API key:

  1. Go to the Google API Console.
  2. From the Project drop-down menu, select the project created for you when you purchased the Premium Plan. The project name starts with Google Maps APIs for Business or Google Maps for Work or Google Maps.
    Important: If you have a previous Maps API for Business license, you must use a client ID, not an API key.
  3. Click Continue.
  4. On the Credentials page, get an API key.
    Note: If you have an existing unrestricted API key, or a key with browser restrictions, you may use that key.
  5. From the dialog displaying the API key, select Restrict key to set a browser restriction on the API key.
  6. In the Key restriction section, select HTTP referrers (web sites), follow the on-screen instructions to set referrers, then click Save. Read more about restricting API keys.

You can also look up an existing key in the Google API Console.

For more information on using the Google API Console, see API Console Help.

Creating digital signatures to use with a Premium Plan API key

For Premium Plan customers, requests to the Google Street View Image API that use a key parameter must also include a signature parameter, containing a digital signature which you must generate using a shared URL signing secret. Your shared secret is available on the Google API Console.

The signing process uses an encryption algorithm to combine the URL and your shared secret. The resulting unique signature allows our servers to verify that any site generating requests using your API key is authorized to do so.

Creating a digital signature is a two-step process:

Step 1: Get your URL signing secret (for Premium Plan customers using an API key)

Your cryptographic URL signing secret is available on the Google API Console. The secret, also known as a private key, is encoded in a modified Base64 for URLs. This secret is shared between you and Google, and is unique to your API key. Please keep your URL signing secret secure. Do not pass it any requests, store it on any websites, or post it to any public forum. Anyone obtaining this URL signing secret could spoof requests using your identity.

You can click this link to go directly to the API Console page containing your URL signing secret. Important: In the project drop-down menu, be sure to select the project created for you when you purchased the Premium Plan.*

Alternatively, follow these steps to see your URL signing secret:

  1. Go to the Google API Console.
  2. From the Project drop-down menu, select the Google Maps Premium project.*
  3. From the APIs list on the Dashboard page, click the name of the Google Street View Image API. The API details display, with the Overview tab open.
  4. Click the URL signing secret tab.

To get a new URL signing secret, click Regenerate secret. The previous secret expires 24 hours after you've generated a new one. After the 24 hours have passed, requests containing the old secret no longer work.

* Note: In the project drop-down menu, you must select the project created for you when you purchased the Premium Plan. The project name starts with Google Maps APIs for Business or Google Maps for Work or Google Maps. Important: If you have a previous Maps API for Business license, you must use a client ID, not an API key.

Step 2: Generate a digital signature, for use with API keys

To create a digital signature for your request, follow the steps in the detailed guide below.


Authenticating your application using a client ID and signature

To authenticate the Street View API using a client ID (instead of the API key), two authentication parameters are required: a client ID, and a unique digital signature.

If you were previously using an API key for authentication and are switching to using a client ID, you must remove the key parameter before loading the API. The API will fail to load if both a client ID and an API key are included.

Your client ID and signature

Upon purchasing your Google Maps APIs Premium Plan license, you will receive a welcome email from Google that contains your client ID and your private cryptographic key.

  • Your client ID is used to access the special features of Google Maps APIs Premium Plan. In the sample below, substitute YOUR_CLIENT_ID with the client ID you got in your welcome email. All client IDs begin with a gme- prefix.

  • A unique digital signature is generated using your private cryptographic key. In the code sample below, substitute SIGNATURE with your unique digital signature. You can find more information about generating a signature below, in the section on digital signatures to use with client IDs.

    <img src="https://maps.googleapis.com/maps/api/streetview
      ?location=40.720032,-73.988354
      &size=400x400
      &fov=90&heading=235&pitch=10
      &client=YOUR_CLIENT_ID
      &signature=SIGNATURE">

If you have lost your client ID or private cryptographic key, you can recover it by logging in to the Google Cloud Support Portal and clicking Maps: Manage Client ID from the links on the left of the page.

Optional parameter for reports

When using a client ID for API authentication, the following optional parameter is available for use:

  • channel is used to provide additional reporting detail, by grouping different channels separately in your reports. Refer to the Premium Plan Reporting Overview for more information.

Generate a digital signature to use with a client ID

To create a digital signature for your request, follow the steps in the detailed guide below.

Detailed guides to generating a digital signature

Generating a digital signature to use with API keys

Follow these steps to create a digital signature to be used in combination with an API key (if using a client ID, see the detailed guide below). These instructions apply to the use of the standard API as well as Premium Plan customers authenticating with an API key:

  1. Construct the request URL without the signature, making sure to include your API key in the key parameter. Note that you must URL-encode any non-standard characters. For example:

    https://maps.googleapis.com/maps/api/streetview?location=41.403609,2.174448&size=456x456&key=YOUR_API_KEY

    Note: All Google services require UTF-8 character encoding (which implicitly includes ASCII). If your applications operate using other character sets, make sure they construct URLs using UTF-8 and properly URL-encode them.

  2. Strip off the domain portion of the request, leaving only the path and the query:

    /maps/api/streetview?location=41.403609,2.174448&size=456x456&key=YOUR_API_KEY

  3. Retrieve your URL signing secret, which is encoded in a modified Base64 for URLs, and sign the above URL above using the HMAC-SHA1 algorithm.

    You may need to decode your secret into its original binary format. Note that in most cryptographic libraries, the resulting signature is in binary format.

    Note: Modified Base64 for URLs replaces the + and / characters of standard Base64 with - and _ respectively, so that these Base64 signatures no longer need to be URL-encoded.

  4. Encode the resulting binary signature using the modified Base64 for URLs to convert this signature into something that can be passed within a URL.

  5. Add the resulting signature to the request URL within a signature parameter. For example:

    https://maps.googleapis.com/maps/api/streetview?location=41.403609,2.174448&size=456x456&key=YOUR_API_KEY&signature=BASE64_SIGNATURE

For samples showing ways to implement URL signing using server-side code, see Sample code for URL signing.

To sign a URL now, enter your URL and your URL signing secret below. The URL must have the format described in step 1 above, and be URL-encoded.

Generating a digital signature to use with client IDs

Requests to the Street View API using the client parameter also require a digital signature, generated using the private cryptographic key provided to you in your welcome email.

The signing process combines a URL and the key together using an encryption algorithm. The resulting unique signature allows our servers to verify that any site generating requests using your client ID are authorized to do so. The signature is also unique per URL, ensuring that requests that use your client ID cannot be modified without requiring a new signature to be generated.

Your private cryptographic key

Your private cryptographic URL-signing key will be issued with your client ID and is a "secret shared key" between you and Google. This signing key is yours alone and is unique to your client ID. For that reason, please keep your signing key secure. This key should not be passed within any requests, stored on any websites, or posted to any public forum. Anyone obtaining this signing key could spoof requests using your identity.

Note: This private cryptographic signing key is not the same as the API keys issued by the Google API Console.

If you've lost your private cryptographic key, log in to the Google Cloud Support Portal and click Maps: Manage Client ID to retrieve it.

Generate a digital signature to use with client IDs

Attempting to access the Street View API with an invalid signature will result in a HTTP 403 (Forbidden) error. As you convert your applications to use URL signing, make sure to test your signatures to ensure they initiate a valid request. You should first test whether the original URL is valid as well as test whether you generate the correct signatures.

Follow these steps to create a digital signature for your request:

  1. Construct the request URL without the signature, making sure to include your client parameter. Note that any non-standard characters will need to be URL-encoded:

    https://maps.googleapis.com/maps/api/streetview?location=41.403609,2.174448&size=456x456&client=clientID

    Note: All Google services require UTF-8 character encoding (which implicitly includes ASCII). If your applications operate using other character sets, make sure they construct URLs using UTF-8 and properly URL-encode them.

  2. Strip off the domain portion of the request, leaving only the path and the query:

    /maps/api/streetview?location=41.403609,2.174448&size=456x456&client=clientID

  3. Retrieve your private key, which is encoded in a modified Base64 for URLs, and sign the URL above using the HMAC-SHA1 algorithm. You may need to decode this key into its original binary format. Note that in most cryptographic libraries, the resulting signature will be in binary format.

    Note: Modified Base64 for URLs replaces the + and / characters of standard Base64 with - and _ respectively, so that these Base64 signatures no longer need to be URL-encoded.

  4. Encode the resulting binary signature using the modified Base64 for URLs to convert this signature into something that can be passed within a URL.

  5. Attach this signature to the URL within a signature parameter:

    https://maps.googleapis.com/maps/api/streetview?location=41.403609,2.174448&size=456x456&client=clientID&signature=base64signature

For samples showing ways to implement URL signing using server-side code, see Sample code for URL signing.

To sign a URL now, enter your URL and your URL signing secret below. The URL must have the format described in step 1 above, and be URL-encoded.

Sample code for URL signing

The following sections show ways to implement URL signing using server-side code. URLs should always be signed server-side to avoid exposing your cryptographic key to users.

Python

The example below uses standard Python libraries to sign a URL. (Download the code.)

#!/usr/bin/python
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
""" Signs a URL using a URL signing secret """

import hashlib
import hmac
import base64
import urlparse

def sign_url(input_url=None, secret=None):
  """ Sign a request URL with a URL signing secret.

      Usage:
      from urlsigner import sign_url

      signed_url = sign_url(input_url=my_url, secret=SECRET)

      Args:
      input_url - The URL to sign
      secret    - Your URL signing secret

      Returns:
      The signed request URL
  """

  if not input_url or not secret:
    raise Exception("Both input_url and secret are required")

  url = urlparse.urlparse(input_url)

  # We only need to sign the path+query part of the string
  url_to_sign = url.path + "?" + url.query

  # Decode the private key into its binary format
  # We need to decode the URL-encoded private key
  decoded_key = base64.urlsafe_b64decode(secret)

  # Create a signature using the private key and the URL-encoded
  # string using HMAC SHA1. This signature will be binary.
  signature = hmac.new(decoded_key, url_to_sign, hashlib.sha1)

  # Encode the binary signature into base64 for use within a URL
  encoded_signature = base64.urlsafe_b64encode(signature.digest())

  original_url = url.scheme + "://" + url.netloc + url.path + "?" + url.query

  # Return signed URL
  return original_url + "&signature=" + encoded_signature

if __name__ == "__main__":
  input_url = raw_input("URL to Sign: ")
  secret = raw_input("URL signing secret: ")
  print "Signed URL: " + sign_url(input_url, secret)

Java

The example below uses the java.util.Base64 class available since JDK 1.8 - older versions may need to use Apache Commons or similar. (Download the code.)

import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.UnsupportedEncodingException;
import java.net.URI;
import java.net.URISyntaxException;
import java.security.InvalidKeyException;
import java.security.NoSuchAlgorithmException;
import java.util.Base64;  // JDK 1.8 only - older versions may need to use Apache Commons or similar.
import javax.crypto.Mac;
import javax.crypto.spec.SecretKeySpec;
import java.net.URL;
import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;

public class UrlSigner {

  // Note: Generally, you should store your private key someplace safe
  // and read them into your code

  private static String keyString = "YOUR_PRIVATE_KEY";
  
  // The URL shown in these examples is a static URL which should already
  // be URL-encoded. In practice, you will likely have code
  // which assembles your URL from user or web service input
  // and plugs those values into its parameters.
  private static String urlString = "YOUR_URL_TO_SIGN";

  // This variable stores the binary key, which is computed from the string (Base64) key
  private static byte[] key;
  
  public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException,
    InvalidKeyException, NoSuchAlgorithmException, URISyntaxException {
    
    BufferedReader input = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
    
    String inputUrl, inputKey = null;

    // For testing purposes, allow user input for the URL.
    // If no input is entered, use the static URL defined above.    
    System.out.println("Enter the URL (must be URL-encoded) to sign: ");
    inputUrl = input.readLine();
    if (inputUrl.equals("")) {
      inputUrl = urlString;
    }
    
    // Convert the string to a URL so we can parse it
    URL url = new URL(inputUrl);
 
    // For testing purposes, allow user input for the private key.
    // If no input is entered, use the static key defined above.   
    System.out.println("Enter the Private key to sign the URL: ");
    inputKey = input.readLine();
    if (inputKey.equals("")) {
      inputKey = keyString;
    }
    
    UrlSigner signer = new UrlSigner(inputKey);
    String request = signer.signRequest(url.getPath(),url.getQuery());
    
    System.out.println("Signed URL :" + url.getProtocol() + "://" + url.getHost() + request);
  }
  
  public UrlSigner(String keyString) throws IOException {
    // Convert the key from 'web safe' base 64 to binary
    keyString = keyString.replace('-', '+');
    keyString = keyString.replace('_', '/');
    System.out.println("Key: " + keyString);
    // Base64 is JDK 1.8 only - older versions may need to use Apache Commons or similar.
    this.key = Base64.getDecoder().decode(keyString);
  }

  public String signRequest(String path, String query) throws NoSuchAlgorithmException,
    InvalidKeyException, UnsupportedEncodingException, URISyntaxException {
    
    // Retrieve the proper URL components to sign
    String resource = path + '?' + query;
    
    // Get an HMAC-SHA1 signing key from the raw key bytes
    SecretKeySpec sha1Key = new SecretKeySpec(key, "HmacSHA1");

    // Get an HMAC-SHA1 Mac instance and initialize it with the HMAC-SHA1 key
    Mac mac = Mac.getInstance("HmacSHA1");
    mac.init(sha1Key);

    // compute the binary signature for the request
    byte[] sigBytes = mac.doFinal(resource.getBytes());

    // base 64 encode the binary signature
    // Base64 is JDK 1.8 only - older versions may need to use Apache Commons or similar.
    String signature = Base64.getEncoder().encodeToString(sigBytes);
    
    // convert the signature to 'web safe' base 64
    signature = signature.replace('+', '-');
    signature = signature.replace('/', '_');
    
    return resource + "&signature=" + signature;
  }
}

C#

The example below uses the default System.Security.Cryptography library to sign a URL request. Note that we need to convert the default Base64 encoding to implement a URL-safe version. (Download the code.)

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Security.Cryptography;
using System.Text;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;
using System.Web;

namespace SignUrl {

  public struct GoogleSignedUrl {

    public static string Sign(string url, string keyString) {
      ASCIIEncoding encoding = new ASCIIEncoding();

      // converting key to bytes will throw an exception, need to replace '-' and '_' characters first.
      string usablePrivateKey = keyString.Replace("-", "+").Replace("_", "/");
      byte[] privateKeyBytes = Convert.FromBase64String(usablePrivateKey);

      Uri uri = new Uri(url);
      byte[] encodedPathAndQueryBytes = encoding.GetBytes(uri.LocalPath + uri.Query);

      // compute the hash
      HMACSHA1 algorithm = new HMACSHA1(privateKeyBytes);
      byte[] hash = algorithm.ComputeHash(encodedPathAndQueryBytes);

      // convert the bytes to string and make url-safe by replacing '+' and '/' characters
      string signature = Convert.ToBase64String(hash).Replace("+", "-").Replace("/", "_");
            
      // Add the signature to the existing URI.
      return uri.Scheme+"://"+uri.Host+uri.LocalPath + uri.Query +"&signature=" + signature;
    }
  }

  class Program {

    static void Main() {
    
      // Note: Generally, you should store your private key someplace safe
      // and read them into your code

      const string keyString = "YOUR_PRIVATE_KEY";
  
      // The URL shown in these examples is a static URL which should already
      // be URL-encoded. In practice, you will likely have code
      // which assembles your URL from user or web service input
      // and plugs those values into its parameters.
      const  string urlString = "YOUR_URL_TO_SIGN";
      
      string inputUrl = null;
      string inputKey = null;
    
      Console.WriteLine("Enter the URL (must be URL-encoded) to sign: ");
      inputUrl = Console.ReadLine();
      if (inputUrl.Length == 0) {
        inputUrl = urlString;
      }     
    
      Console.WriteLine("Enter the Private key to sign the URL: ");
      inputKey = Console.ReadLine();
      if (inputKey.Length == 0) {
        inputKey = keyString;
      }
      
      Console.WriteLine(GoogleSignedUrl.Sign(inputUrl,inputKey));
    }
  }
}

Restricting an API key

Google Maps APIs are available for web browsers, Android or iOS apps, and via HTTP web services. APIs in any platform can use a generic (unrestricted) API key. You can optionally add a restriction (for example, HTTP referrer) to the API key. Once restricted, a key will only work on platforms that support that type of restriction.

Tip: Before moving your app or website to production, you should secure your API key. Keys for the Google Street View Image API use the HTTP referrers (web sites) key restriction. Learn more about keys and credentials.

To add web browser restrictions to an existing, generic API key, do the following:

  1. Go to the Credentials page of the Google API Console.
  2. Select the project that contains the API key you want to edit.
  3. On the Credentials page, from the list of API keys, select the name of the API key to edit the details of the key.
  4. In the Key restriction section of the page, select HTTP referrers (web sites), follow the on-screen instructions to set referrers, then click Save.

Note: file:// referers need a special representation to be added to the Key restriction. The "file:/" part should be replaced with "__file_url__" before being added to the Key restriction. For example, "file:///path/to/" should be formatted as "__file_url__//path/to/*". After enabling file:// referers, it is recommended you regularly check your usage, to make sure it matches your expectations.

Troubleshooting authentication issues

If your request is malformed or supplies an invalid signature, the Google Street View Image API returns an HTTP 403 (Forbidden) error.

To troubleshoot individual URLs, you can use the URL Signing Debugger. It allows you to quickly validate a URL and signature generated by your application.

Alternatively, Google Maps APIs Premium Plan customers can troubleshoot individual URLs by logging in to the Google Cloud Support Portal and selecting Resources > Google Maps APIs Premium Plan online tools > URL Signing Debugger for Web Service and Image APIs.

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