UX guidelines

When you're designing apps that invoke Google Photos APIs, follow the user experience (UX) guidelines below.

Screenshot of notice guideline for Google Photos

Before requesting access to a user’s Google Photos library, your app should clarify why each OAuth scope is needed. Request only the scopes needed for a feature to work and nothing extra, please see the Authentication and authorization scopes for details. When fetching information from their Google Photos library, let your users know what is happening.

Account and Disconnection

After the user grants access, ensure that they're always aware that their Google Account is being used and is connected to your app. Display information about the connected account so the user understands which account they are currently connected to. Provide a clear path to disconnect their Google Account in the app.

When your app is used in a public space (eg. on a TV or at an event), don’t display the user’s name or email address. Only use the account avatar in public spaces.

Guidelines
Screenshot of connected user account and disconnect button Do...

Show the user the account they’re connected with and provide a clear and easy way to disconnect.

Screenshot of unacceptable location of account disconnect action, lack of account
                  information and misleading UI pattern for a disconnect action Don't...

Bury the ability to disconnect in a non-obvious location.

Omit account information that would help the user identify the currently connected account.

Use UI patterns that indicate single action reconnection.

In-app sharing

Screenshot of sharing guideline for Google Photos

When using sharing functionality, there are some things to keep in mind:

  • Before creating or contributing to a shared album, inform the users that the action is “using your Google Photos account.”
  • In your app, always provide a link to albums users are contributing to, and make that link persistently accessible.
  • The user should know what content and information is being shared.
  • The user should know who the audience is.

Using the Google Photos brand

You can use the Google Photos branding elements in your app without pre-approval, provided you follow these basic guidelines. Acceptable treatments for in-app use include the use of a Google Photos-branded button or mentions of “Google Photos” in labels, headers, or other plain-text formats.

Use of Google brands in ways not expressly covered by these guidelines isn't allowed without prior written consent from Google. For more information, see the Google Brand Permissions.

Guidelines
Screenshot of using acceptable Google Photos branded button Do...

Use a Google Photos branded button or the Google Photos name in plain text for UI elements.

Screenshot of unacceptable usage of Google Photos branded button Don't...

Use the Google Photos full logo or wordmark for UI elements.

Action buttons

You can use a Google Photos branded button when activating experiences that use your integration with Google Photos APIs.

Don't use a Google Photos branded button when your app is using multiple Google services and/or is using Google for general sign in purposes. In these cases, use the Sign in with Google button, and reference the Sign-In Branding Guidelines.

Guidelines
Screenshot of acceptable usage of Google Photos branded for action button Do...

Use Google Photos branded buttons when activating Google Photos-specific experiences or content.

Screenshot of unacceptable usage of Google Photos branded action button Don't...

Use Google Photos-specific language and assets in the UI if you're going to ask for access to multiple Google product APIs or if you're using Google for general sign-in purposes. Use the Sign in with Google button instead.

Button guidelines

Guideline Description
Standard appearance Screenshot of standard Google Photos button For a button that requires user action, you must use the full-color Google Photos icon on a white (#FFFFFF) background paired with a dark gray (#3C4043) text label. Alternatively, you can use a standard text button with no iconography.

When using a button with the Google Photos icon, use a white background and the full-color Google Photos icon that adheres to the minimum margins and spacing provided. The minimum size for the Google Photos icon is 24x24 dp.

Size Screenshot of acceptable scaling of the standard Google Photos button You can scale the button as needed for different devices and screen sizes, but you must preserve the aspect ratio so that the Google Photos icon isn’t stretched.
Equal prominence The Google Photos button must be displayed at least as prominently as other third-party options.
Acceptable use
Screenshot of the acceptable usage of the Add to Google Photos and Save to
          Google Photos buttons Words like “Add” or “Save” are most appropriate for one-time access to a user’s Google Photos library.
Screenshot of the acceptable usage of the Connect to Google Photos button Words like “Connect” are appropriate when there will be a sustained link to Google Photos.
Screenshot of the acceptable usage of an action button without the
          Google Photos logo Using text alone for an action button, without the Google Photos logo, is acceptable.
Unacceptable use
Screenshot of unacceptable usage of Google Photos action button with
          colored background Don't put the Google Photos icon on top of a colored background.
Screenshot of unacceptable usage of color modification to the Google Photos
          icon Don't change the color of the Google Photos icon or use a one-color version of the icon.
Screenshot of unacceptable usage of the Google Photos icon without the
          Google Photos wording Don't use the Google Photos icon by itself.
Screenshot of unacceptable usage of the full Google Photos logo as a
          button Don't use the full Google Photos logo in UI assets like buttons.
Screenshot of unacceptable usage of the full Google Photos logo without
          action keywords Don't use the Google Photos icon by itself.

Text in UI

For all other actions or references to Google Photos in your app, use text. Text should be used for non-button actions such as hyperlinks. Text should also be used for non-actionable elements like headers, titles, and other labels.

When referencing a user’s ownership of content, write “Your Google Photos library” or “From Google Photos” Don't use, “Your Google Photos”

Do...

Use text for referencing Google Photos in headers, labels, and other non-branded-button elements.

Don't...

Don't add visual treatments to mentions of Google Photos in plain text or non-button elements.

Naming

Naming your product

Make reference to Google Photos by using the text "for", "for use with", "works with", or "compatible with". When using the Google Photos trademark, attribution is required. Once approved as a Google Photos APIs partner, please follow the "Legal requirements" section of the Google Photos Partner Marketing Hub, which may require registration to access. When making reference to Google Photos in combination with your logo, the referencing text should be smaller in size than your logo.

Guidelines
Example of acceptable naming: XYZ Software for Google Photos Do...

Use conjunctions like "for", "for use with", "works with", or "compatible with".

Use smaller text labels for Google Photos when combining with your product or company logo.

Example of unacceptable naming: Google Photos XYZ Software Don't...

Use Google Photos as the primary brand communication for products.

Naming albums

When adding an album to Google Photos, consider the name of the album from the perspective of a user within Google Photos. When adding a single album for your product's uploads, use your product's name in the album title. If your product adds multiple albums as part of its core offering, it is ok to omit the product name from the album titles.

Guidelines
Screenshot of acceptable album naming: XYZ Software Uploads Do...

Provide product name context if your creations are in a single album in Google Photos.

Screenshot of unacceptable album naming: Uploads Don't...

Use generic album names that could confuse the user.